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Why are Ethiopians starving of hunger again??

On December 21, 1987, Time Magazine on its cover page featured a downcast and crestfallen young Ethiopian mother as a symbol of famine victims in that country. Time asked two timeless questions: “Why are Ethiopians starving again? What should the world do and not do?

In its analysis, Time wrote something that should strikes us all as déjà vu today.

Three years ago [1984], a famine began to strike Ethiopia with apocalyptic force. Westerners watched in horror as the images of death filled their TV screens: the rows of fly-haunted corpses, the skeletal orphans crouched in pain… Today Ethiopia is in the midst of another drought… Ethiopia, which has earned the unhappy honor of being rated the globe’s poorest country by the World Bank (average annual per capita income: + $110; infant mortality rate: 16.8%), is on the brink of disaster again. At least 6 million of its 46 million people face starvation, and only a relief effort on the scale of the one launched three years ago will save them… As the cry [for aid] goes out once more for food and money, the sympathetic cannot be faulted for wondering why this is happening all over again. Is the latest famine wholly the result of cruel nature, or are other, man-made forces at work that worsen the catastrophe?…

In 2011, Ethiopia is the second poorest country in the world despite fanciful claims of 15 a percent annual economic growth and fantasies of building the largest hydroelectric dams in all of Africa by dictator Meles Zenawi. According to official statements of the Zenawi regime, 4.5 million of the estimated 90 million Ethiopians need 380 metric tons of food at a cost of USD$400 million. Jason Frasier, mission director of USAID in Ethiopia recently cautioned that Zenawi’s regime “may be underestimating the country’s needs in its drought crisis, even as the government announced that 4.5 million Ethiopians need food aid, 40 percent more than last year. We are concerned that we are underestimating the situation, especially in the southern provinces.” We are back to the future in 1984!

On August 17, 2011, Wolfgang Fengler, a lead economist for the World Bank, weighed in with a definitive answer to Time’s question: “The [famine] crisis is man made. Droughts have occurred over and again, but you need bad policymaking for that to lead to a famine.” In other words, it is bad governance that is at the core of the famine problem in Ethiopia, not drought. This is a rare and refreshing departure from the all-too-common bureaucratic mumbo jumbo about the causes of famine often spouted by international aid agencies and multilateral organizations.

TEN REASONS WHY ETHIOPIANS ARE STARVING AGAIN AND AGAIN AND AGAIN… 

Reason #1: Famine is not merely a humanitarian catastrophe in Ethiopia; it is a powerful political and military weapon.

There is a long and ignoble history of political and military weaponization of famine in Ethiopia. In the mid-1980s, the military junta government of Mengistu Hailemariam used famine to punish civilian populations perceived to support rebels in the northern part of the country. The junta prevented delivery of food aid in rebel-held areas (as did the rebels themselves) and implemented a cruel policy of forced migration of civilians in an effort to drain recruits and deny support to the rebels. Zenawi’s regime pursued the same policy to defeat alleged rebels in the Ogaden region and has further used humanitarian aid to consolidate power and starve out his opposition as documented recently in a BIA/BIJ report.  Mao Zedong taught that “Guerrillas are like fish, and the people are the water in which fish swim.” Both Zenawi and Megistu understood that by militarily and politically weaponizing famine, they can poison and drain the water in the lake.  No water! No fish! No problem!

Reason # 2: Famine is a recurrent fact in Ethiopia because that country has been in an endless cycle of dictatorship for decades.

Nobel laureate economist Amartya Sen argues that “there has never been a famine in a functioning multi-party democracy.” In a competitive political process with a functioning free press, there is a much higher degree of political accountability. No freely elected government could afford to ignore famine or abstain from doing all it can to prevent it. Opposition politicians will make famine a major political issue to win elections. A free press will mobilize public opinion to hold those in power accountable for letting “famine occur on their watch.”  In Ethiopia, opposition political parties are non-existent. In 2005, Zenawi jailed the entire leadership of the opposition for nearly two years. He even jailed the first woman political party leader in Ethiopian history, Birtukan Midekssa, and with sadistic indifference declared, “there will never be an agreement with anybody to release Birtukan. Ever. Full stop. That’s a dead issue.” No opposition, no multiparty democracy, no free press, no accountability equals recurrent famines.

Reason # 3: Famine in Ethiopia is an annual crisis because dictators do not give a damn if the people die one by one or by the millions.

The current rulers of Ethiopia, like their junta predecessor, continue to derive spiritual guidance from their patron saints: Stalin and Mao (Chinese financial support today is one of the cornerstones of Zenawi’s regime). Stalin was blasé and arrogantly dismissive of the Ukraine famine of the early 1930s. He said, “A single death is a tragedy; a million deaths is a statistic.” In 1959 during China’s Great Famine, Mao was equally matter-of-fact: “When there is not enough to eat, people starve to death. It is better to let half of the people die so that the other half can eat their fill.” Mengistu said there was no famine when millions of Ethiopians dropped like flies from starvation in 1984-85. But Zenawi is more cunning and pretty slick when it comes to public relations. He said there are emergencies, but no famines. “Famine has wreaked havoc in Ethiopia for so long, it would be stupid not to be sensitive to the risk of such things occurring. But there has not been a famine on our watch – emergencies, but no famines.”

Reason #4. Famine is a structural part of the Ethiopian economy because the “government” owns all the land.

It is said of the golden rule that he who controls the gold makes the rules. The same can be said of land in Ethiopia. Those who own the land makes the rules for those who till the land. Article 40 (1) of the Ethiopian Constitution provides that  “the right to ownership of rural and urban land, as well as of all natural resources, is exclusively vested in the State and in the peoples of Ethiopia.” For all intents and purposes, that means the ruling regime and its supporters own the land. The regime controls who gets what plot of urban or farm land. The regime sells, leases or otherwise traffics in land without any accountability. Recently, the regime sold a  large chunk of the country’s most fertile land to Indian companies for pennies: “For £150 a week (USD$245), you can lease more than 2,500 square kilometres of virgin, fertile [Ethiopian] land – an area the size of Dorset, England – for 50 years, plus generous tax breaks.” The bottom line is that those who own the land are more interested in meeting the needs of other people in other places than the Ethiopian people. Zenawi has condemned Ethiopian developers who were transferring their leaseholds in  urban land in Addis Ababa as “land grabbers” and “speculators” who should be “locked up”. The old feudal landlords are today replaced by new landlords in designer suits.

Reason # 5: Famine persists in Ethiopia because massive human rights abuses persist.

The Zenawi regime is well-known for trashing the human and constitutional rights of Ethiopian citizens.  Perhaps unknown to many is the regime’s flagrant violation of its affirmative legal duty to provide a “standard of living adequate for the health and well-being… including food for its citizens.”  (Universal Declaration of Human Rights 25(1); The International Covenant on Economic Social and Cultural Rights  (ICESCR) Article 11(2) [“fundamental right of everyone to be free from hunger”]; Ethiopian Constitution, Article 90 of the Constitution,  [“provide all Ethiopians with access to public health and education, clean water, housing, food and social insurance”].  Weaponizing hunger to decimate one’s opposition is a crime against humanity. But hunger is the new weapon of choice in human rights violations in Ethiopia. Those who oppose the regime are not only denied humanitarian food and relief aid, they are also victimized through a system of evictions, denial of land or reduction in plot size as well as denial of access to  loans, fertilizers, seeds, etc. In the case of the people of Gambella, entire communities are forced off the land to make way for Indian investors in violation of conventions that protect the rights of indigenous peoples. Zenawi’s regime believes that the most effective way of crushing the hearts and minds of the people is by keeping their stomachs empty.

Reason #6: Famine persists in Ethiopia because Zenawi has succeeded in keeping the famine hidden.

Emperor Haile Selassie in 1974 pretended there was no famine until the documentary “the Hidden Famine” by Jonathan Dimbleby was aired to a shocked and angry Ethiopian public. Former junta leader Mengistu was arrogantly dismissive during the 1984-85 famine. He asked, “What famine?” Zenawi is far more cunning. His solution is to clampdown on the press and shut the country down to all foreign journalists and media representatives. If any foreign journalists should somehow manage to get through, jail them. That is exactly what he did recently to two Swedish journalists, photojournalist Johan Persson and reporter Martin Schibbye, who were arrested in the Ogaden region where the regime has committed massive human rights violations for years. Regime representative Dina Mufti explained that the two journalists “will be tried according to the national law … for the terrorist activities they were planning to undertake.”  Woubshet Taye, deputy editor of Awramba Times (a struggling weekly paper) and one of the few female journalists in the country, Reyot Alemu of Feteh (another struggling weekly paper) newspapers were recently jailed on bogus charges that they were “organizing a terrorist network.” Since there is no independent press in the country and those trying to offer an alternative voice are subject to intimidation, arrest and detention, the famine remains hidden not unlike the days of Emperor Haile Selassie.

Reason #7: Famine persist in Ethiopia because there is a “conspiracy of silence” by Western aid agencies and timid NGOs.  

Zenawi has made it clear that anyone who disputes his claim of 15 percent annual economic growth and rosy picture of the country will be thrown out of the country, vilified  or not allowed to operate. Recently, when Ken Ohashi, the World Bank Country Director for Ethiopia said Zenawi’s economic plan (“Growth and Transformation Plan”) is unsustainable, Zenawi unleashed his legendary vitriol on him: “The World Bank [country] director is used to having other developing nations simply listen to his orders and is not used to nations refusing implement policy based on their wishes. He left here after we refused to let him tell us what to do and wrote this article to get back at us.” In other words, attack the man’s integrity savagely to divert attention from the man’s message.

But all NGOs and international aid agencies know never to use the “F” word, unless of course they use it to deny there is no famine. That is precisely what USAID Deputy Administrator Gregory Gottlieb did last week on a VOA broadcast. He said, “There is no famine in Ethiopia.” The strange thing is that it does not seem Gottlieb  had spoken about the “situation” to Jason Fraser, mission director of USAID in Ethiopia, before making his glib declaration. Fraser said, “We are concerned that we are underestimating the situation, especially in the southern provinces [in Ethiopia].” So the conspiracy of silence goes on to keep the famine hidden by using euphemisms. It is not FAMINE, it is the “situation”, severe malnutrition, food insecurity, food crisis [when Zenawi recently visited China, Premier Wen Jiabao called the famine “crisis”], green drought and so on. The “crisis” is not the result of lack of preventive or long-range planning, official incompetence, corruption, criminal negligence, etc., but the effect of “erratic rains damaged or delayed crops, deforestation overgrazing” and other ecological, environmental, and climatic disasters.

The international poverty mongers are so slick that they have even invented a “scientific” classification system for famine: “Acute Food Insecurity, Stressed, Crisis, Emergency and Catastrophe.” They want us to believe that famine is some sort of neatly-staged transitional process. For a mother and child who have not eaten for days or scrimp on ten kilograms of grain a month, the famine taxanomy is meaningless.  It would be interesting to hear what famine victims would say when they are told that they will not be in a famine state until they drop dead!  The fact of the matter is that a famine by any other name is still famine and just as deadly!

On the other hand, the international agencies and NGOs have a manifest conflcit of interest because by revealing the truth aboout the famine, they are likely to run the risk of a severe tongue-lashing (See Ohashi above), exoposure that their programs are a waste, or if an NGO, deceritifcation and expedited removal from the country. They would rather turn a blind eye and remain silent than use the “F” word.

Reason # 8: Famine persist in Ethiopia because the regime in power for 20 years has failed to devise and implement an effective family planning policy. 

In 1993, Zenawi’s “Transitional Government of Ethiopia” in its “National Population Policy of Ethiopia” (NPPE) declared that “its major goal [was] the harmonization of the rate of population growth and the capacity of the country for the development and rational utilization of natural resources thereby creating conditions conductive to the improvement of the level of welfare of the population.” It aimed to reduce “total fertility rate of 7.7 children per woman to approximately 4.0 by the year 2015 by mounting an effective country wide population information and education programme, expanding clinical and community based contraceptive distribution services, raising the minimum age at marriage for girls and removal of unnecessary restrictions pertaining to the advertisement, propagation and popularization of diverse conception control methods.” In 1993 Ethiopia’s population was estimated at 53 million. In 2011, the population is estimated at 91 million. The numbers speak for themselves!

Reason # 9: Famine in Ethiopia is good business.

There are many who profit from economic emergences created by famines. There is much money to be made from trafficking in famine relief aid. According to FAO’s Global Food Monitor for August 2011, in Ethiopia and other Horn countries “prices of cereals have reached record levels… well above their levels a year earlier, substantially reducing access to food by large numbers of population and aggravating the food insecurity in the subregion.” Who benefits from the high prices? Regime-allied middlemen buy massive amounts of grains from farmers at low prices (by offering what appears to be a generous price at the time) and eliminate legitimate small businesses that deal in grain. The same middlemen have an absolute monopoly on the acquisition, sale and distribution of agricultural commodities, and it is not hard to imagine how profitable famines could be. It makes perfect economic sense from the perspective of famine profiteering to place low policy priority on famine prevention and control. It’s the old supply and demand curve. High demand for food and less supply and a chokehold monopoly on the market, and complete control on the distribution of international food aid equals to “mo’ money, mo’ money, and mo’ money” for those in power. Grotesque as it may sound, famine is good for business.

Reason # 10: It is true “a hungry man/woman is an angry man/woman.” Is it not?

The great Bob Marley sang:

Them belly full, but we hungry;
A hungry mob is a angry mob.

Cost of livin’ gets so high,
Rich and poor they start to cry:
Now the weak must get strong;

Now the weak must get strong.

Previous commentaries by the author are available at: www.huffingtonpost.com/alemayehu-g-mariam/ and http://open.salon.com/blog/almariam/

 

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9 Comments to “Why are Ethiopians Starving Again in 2011?”

  1. Mamo says:This is the direction I want to see discussions going. While appreciating Professor Alemayehu’s article, I want to make a comment on something I have seen in Ethiopian community.Now when I read Alemayehu’s article, I read a well thought out, sensible, systematic and enlightened opinion on a lot of subjects that concern Ethiopia.Then for this one man, we have thousands and thousands of completely clueless people raving and ranting here and there.

    The intellectual disparity I observe among Ethiopians is so amazing to me I can not quite explain why it is so. Why does the community bring forth a handful of sensible persons only? Why is that the vast majority of the population is so ignorant in even things that directly concern them. It just baffles me.

    August 22nd, 2011 at 1:46 AM

  2. eminet says:I am tired of this awful parasitic/narcistic person. Ethiopia is poor because of a person like you who lives comfort at the expense of others and complain about others without contributing anything. Why don’t you back to your country and do something rather dropping water from your red eyes and opening your wide mouth. SYTOP IT !!!!August 22nd, 2011 at 5:36 PM
  3. LEMMA says:IT IS BECAUSE THE MELES ZENAWI GOVERNMENT IS USING MAFIA THUGS STYLE WAY OF MANAGING FARM LANDS IN ETHIOPIA . MELES ZENAWI AND THUGS MAFIA CO. HAS MADE IT INPOSSIBLE TO FARM IN ETHIOPIA UNLESS THE GOVERNMENT THUGS CADRES RECIEVE PROTECTION MONEY BRIBE FROM THE LAND OWNERS FARMING . THE LAND OWNERS THROUGH MANY WAYS HIRE CORRUPT INDIVIDUALS SO THEY FACILITATE THE PROTECTION WHILE FARMING IN AN ILLEGALLY – SNATCHED LANDS FROM THEIR RIGHTFUL OWNERS . TO IAugust 22nd, 2011 at 5:42 PM
  4. Anonymous says:Famin in Ethiopia has been always man made, because those in power profit from the disaster. Here is the contrast, Ethiopia a country that boast of having 3000 years history and ‘Lemlem hagere’ with several perinial rivers is begging for food year in year out, and a small country Eritrea in less than 20 years of independence is ploughing ‘rock land’ in a semidesert environment with seasonal river flows is be able to be self sufficent in food and not going to beg. Unless Ethiopians take control of our country, famin is unavoidable. Do you know the fastest agricultural enterprise in the last 20 years in Ethiopia is the cultivation of Khat or Chat. Chat cultivation have expanded from its traditional area of Harar to allover the Southern regions and northern part of the country. Farmers are uprooting coffee and replacing is with Chat. Yes few are benefiting from the cash crop exporting Chat all over the world. Ethiopia is growing drugs while Eritreans are producing wheat and sorghum. No wonder why Ethiopia is still starving again in 2011!August 22nd, 2011 at 8:16 PM
  5. satenaw says:The main problem is the dictator, in no time get rid off him!
    Let the world listen to the people, not to the dictator!! It is undeniable that all dictators are almost the same in their deed.August 22nd, 2011 at 11:33 PM
  6. kena says:It is because of you wordy and pompous losers who were taught at the expense of the poor Ethiopians, and abscond where you are sent to pursue your education.August 23rd, 2011 at 5:22 AM
  7. united we stand says:reason # 7
    Dear prof. Al, y do the NGO’s turn blind eye & remain silent than use the ‘f’ word if their main concern is saving lives?
    I undertand as scholar u probably prefer standing deplamatically and poletically correct; however, wen one simplifies the equation into the lowest terms u would unfortunately hit the ugly respose: MAKING LUCARATIVE BUSINESSES W/THE RITE DICTATORS!August 23rd, 2011 at 9:19 PM
  8. Tedklai says:Elias!!!! I always thought you are one the very few Ethiopians who have balls. You censored my comment for fear of what? But you still remain a friend an I hope we will have a chance to see each other in the so beautiful Asmara!!!August 24th, 2011 at 1:16 AM
  9. PROUD NATION says:Peter Rosset, executive director of the Institute for Food and Development Policy, co-authored a book in 1998 titled WORLD HUNGER: TWELVE MYTHS. “The true source of world hunger is not scarcity but policy; not inevitability but politics,” said Rosset. “The real culprits are econommies that fail to offer everyone opportunities.”
source: www.ethiopianreview.com

Short URL: http://www.ethiogermany.de/?p=2990

Posted by on Aug 28 2011. Filed under Headlines. You can follow any responses to this entry through the RSS 2.0. You can leave a response or trackback to this entry

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